A Puccini-eye view

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in American culture, Dramatizing the world's music, My blog, Philippa - an opera in progress

Continuing my blogs on the development of the opera Philippa, about the Harlem-born concert pianist, Philippa Duke Schuyler who died in Vietnam rescuing schoolchildren in 1967. Giacomo Puccini could judge the operatic suitability of a play even if he saw it in another language. The Italian speaker saw Sardou’s La Tosca in French, and Belasco’s Madam […]

End of the rebirth (Philippa – an opera, blog 12)

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in American culture, Loving Oz and the US, My blog, Opera articles, Philippa - an opera in progress

More on my development of the opera Philippa. Concert pianist Philippa Duke Schuyler was the daughter of Harlem-based African-American journalist George S. Schuyler and white Texan Josephine Cogdell who thought that if they combined their superior genes they could produce a genius – and proved it. Philippa was, indeed, a prodigy. She played her own […]

Life-changing statements

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in Australian culture, Loving Oz and the US, My blog, Observations, Words

Over the years I’ve noted down statements that I consider life changing. I ended my previous blog (Words, words, words, 11 December 2012) with one of my favourites: Thomas Jefferson’s “Not a blade of grass grows uninteresting to me”. Others have been: “The problem’s the problem; the person’s not the problem.” Yesterday we were at […]

Words, words, words (Philippa, an opera – blog 11)

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in American culture, My blog, Opera articles, Philippa - an opera in progress, Words

…continuing my series of blogs on the development of the opera Philippa, based on the life of Harlem-born concert pianist Philippa Duke Schuyler. Philippa was the daughter of African-American journalist George S. Schuyler and white Texan Josephine Cogdell who thought that if they combined their superior genes they could produce a genius. Philippa was, indeed, […]